Estimating Market Rate Of Return When Volume Or Activity Is Slight – FAQ | IFRS

Estimating market rate of return when volume or activity is slight

Entity A invests in a junior AAA-rated tranche of a residential mortgage-backed security on 1 January 20X8 (the issue date of the security). The junior tranche is the third most senior of a total of seven tranches.

The underlying collateral for the residential mortgage-backed security is unguaranteed non-conforming residential mortgage loans that were issued in the second half of 20X6.

At 31 March 20X9 (the measurement date) the junior tranche is now A-rated. This tranche of the residential mortgage-backed security was previously traded through a brokered market. However, trading volume in that market was infrequent, with only a few transactions taking place per month from 1 January 20X8 to 30 June 20X8 and little, if any, trading activity during the nine months before 31 March 20X9.

Entity A determines whether there has been a significant decrease in the volume or level of activity for the junior tranche of the residential mortgage-backed security in which it has invested. After evaluating the significance and relevance of the factors, Entity A concludes that the volume and level of activity of the junior tranche of the residential mortgage-backed security have significantly decreased. Entity A supported its judgment primarily on the basis that there was little, if any, trading activity for an extended period before the measurement date.

Because there is little, if any, trading activity to support a valuation technique using a market approach, Entity A decides to use an income approach using the discount rate adjustment technique described in IFRS 13 to measure the fair value of the residential mortgage-backed security at the measurement date. Entity A uses the contractual cash flows from the residential mortgage-backed security. Entity A then estimates a discount rate (i.e., a market rate of return) to discount those contractual cash flows. The market rate of return is estimated using both of the following:

  1. the risk-free rate of interest, and
  2. estimated adjustments for differences between the available market data and the junior tranche of the residential mortgage-backed security in which Entity A has invested.

Those adjustments reflect available market data about expected non-performance and other risks (e.g., default risk, collateral value risk and liquidity risk) that market participants would take into account when pricing the asset in an orderly transaction at the measurement date under current market conditions. EntityA took into account the following information when estimating the adjustments per IFRS 13:

  1. The credit spread for the junior tranche of the residential mortgage-backed security at the issue date as implied by the original transaction price.
  2. The change in the credit spread implied by any observed transactions from the issue date to the measurement date for comparable residential mortgage-backed securities or on the basis of relevant indices.
  3. The characteristics of the junior tranche of the residential mortgage-backed security compared with comparable residential mortgage-backed securities or indices, including all the following:
    1. the quality of the underlying assets, ie information about the performance of the underlying mortgage loans such as delinquency and foreclosure rates, loss experience and prepayment rates;
    2. the seniority or subordination of the residential mortgage-backed security tranche held; and
    3. other relevant factors.
  4. Relevant reports issued by analysts and rating agencies.
  5. Quoted prices from third parties such as brokers or pricing services.

Entity A estimates that one indication of the market rate of return that market participants would use when pricing the junior tranche of the residential mortgage-backed security is 12 per cent (1,200 basis points). This market rate of return was estimated as follows:

  1. Begin with 300 basis points for the relevant risk-free rate of interest at 31 March 20X9.
  2. Add 250 basis points for the credit spread over the risk-free rate when the junior tranche was issued in January 20X8.
  3. Add 700 basis points for the estimated change in the credit spread over the risk-free rate of the junior tranche between 1 January 20X8 and 31 March 20X9. This estimate was developed on the basis of the change in the most comparable index available for that time period.
  4. Subtract 50 basis points (net) to adjust for differences between the index used to estimate the change in credit spreads and the junior tranche. The referenced index consists of sub-prime mortgage loans, whereas Entity A’s residential mortgage-backed security consists of similar mortgage loans with a more favorable credit profile (making it more attractive to market participants). However, the index does not reflect an appropriate liquidity risk premium for the junior tranche under current market conditions. Thus, the 50 basis point adjustment is the net of two adjustments:
    1. The first adjustment is a 350 basis point subtraction, which was estimated by comparing the implied yield from the most recent transactions for the residential mortgage-backed security in June 20X8 with the implied yield in the index price on those same dates. There was no information available that indicated that the relationship between Entity A’s security and the index has changed.
    2. The second adjustment is a 300 basis point addition, which is Entity A’s best estimate of the additional liquidity risk inherent in its security (a cash position) when compared with the index (a synthetic position).

This estimate was derived after taking into account liquidity risk premiums implied in recent cash transactions for a range of similar securities.

As an additional indication of the market rate of return, Entity A takes into account two recent indicative quotes (i.e., non-binding quotes) provided by reputable brokers for the junior tranche of the residential mortgage-backed security that imply yields of 15–17%. Entity A is unable to evaluate the valuation technique(s) or inputs used to develop the quotes. However, Entity A is able to confirm that the quotes do not reflect the results of actual transactions.

Because Entity A has multiple indications of the market rate of return that market participants would take into account when measuring fair value, it evaluates and weights the respective indications of the rate of return, considering the reasonableness of the range indicated by the results. Entity A concludes that 13% is the point within the range of indications that is most representative of fair value under current market conditions. Entity A places more weight on the 12% indication (i.e., its own estimate of the market rate of return) for the following reasons:

  1. Entity A concluded that its own estimate appropriately incorporated the risks (eg default risk, collateral value risk and liquidity risk) that market participants would use when pricing the asset in an orderly transaction under current market conditions.
  2. The broker quotes were non-binding and did not reflect the results of transactions, and Entity A was unable to evaluate the valuation technique(s) or inputs used to develop the quotes.

Estimating market rate of return when volume or activity is slight Estimating market rate of return when volume or activity is slight Estimating market rate of return when volume or activity is slight

Estimating market rate of return when volume or activity is slight Estimating market rate of return when volume or activity is slight Estimating market rate of return when volume or activity is slight

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